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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 79-83

Dental consequences of mouth breathing in the pediatric age group


1 Department of Pedodontics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, King George's Medical University (KGMU), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, King George's Medical University (KGMU), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Department of Otorhinolaryngolog, King George's Medical University (KGMU), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Department of Orthodontics, King George's Medical University (KGMU), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Seema Malhotra
Department of Pedodontics, Saraswati Dental College, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-6027.135977

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Background: The presence of mouth breathing (MB) in pediatric patients is a relatively common fact and may result in a series of changes characteristic of occlusal features. In the presence of unbalanced muscular activity, dental inter-arch relationship is the important parameter to understand the patient's occlusion. Therefore, it is important to assess the occurrence of occlusal disorders among MB children. Aim: The present study is undertaken to verify the dental occlusal characteristics with extent of MB and nasal breathing in a pediatric patient. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed to assess the association of changed mode of respiration with occlusal variables from dental cast. Ninety-two subjects, of whom 40 were mouth breathers and 52 were nasal breathers, of 7-11 years of age were submitted to clinical examination and dental cast analysis. Results: Mouth breathers demonstrated considerable increase in palatal height and increased overjet, and statistically significant narrowing of the upper arch at the level of the molar. Conclusion: Changed mode of respiration during critical growth periods in children has a higher tendency for increased palatal height and overjet, reduced overbite and maxillary intermolar width.


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